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Meet Rainee, our 2018 Ambassador

Rainee is an adorable, smart, funny, loveable little girl.  She enjoys dance and dolls like every little girl does, and she just happens to struggle with Sensory Processing Disorder.

Sensory Processing Disorder or SPD, is when the brain has trouble organizing information from the senses. Sensory processing issues can impact a child’s social skills. It can also cause difficulties in the classroom.  Although every person is unique, people with SPD usually fall into one of two categories, hypersensitive or hyposensitive.  Rainee has hyposensitive Sensory Processing Disorder.

Hyposensitive (or undersensitive) children lack sensitivity to their surroundings. They might have a high tolerance for or indifference to pain. They may be “sensory seeking,” meaning they have a constant need to touch people or things—even when it’s not appropriate. They may also have trouble with personal space or be clumsy and uncoordinated. They might be constantly on the move and take risks on the playground, accidentally harming other kids when playing.

Rainee’s parents, Shane and Jackie saw signs from infancy. Like many children with SPD, Rainee needed to be held much of the time. By the time Rainee was 18 months, her symptoms became severe enough to affect normal functioning and disrupt everyday life.

“When Rainee was 18 months we were concerned because she was constantly fidgeting, didn’t have an interest in playing, was not speaking much at all and rarely made eye contact, said Jackie. She would constantly run into the couch or other things and spent hours lining up and organizing toys.”

Her parents expressed their concerns to their pediatrician who referred the family to SRRC. Rainee began Developmental and Speech Therapy and eventually attended Toddler Class in Ottawa. She also received Occupational Therapy services.  Therapy depends on a child's individual needs. But in general, it involves helping children do better at activities they're normally not good at and helping them get used to things they can't tolerate.

“Rainee will lead a normal life", said Kelly Bault, Developmental Therapist at SRRC. "She will just have to work a little harder than a typical child. Kids don’t grow out of Sensory Processing Disorder; they grow into it, unless we spot it and treat it — the sooner, the better.".

"Rainee still has many problems daily, but they are a lot more manageable. She is now playing with dolls, socializing with other kids and even participating in a dance class. Without SRRC, none of this would be possible", said Shane.

Meet Our Past Ambassadors

Meet the many faces of Starved Rock Regional Center.  Each child is chosen to represent the center for the year and showcase their unique needs and ways that SRRC has helped them reach their maximum potential.

2017

Jase
Meet Jase ›

2016

Brock
Meet Brock ›

2015

GiGi
Meet GiGi ›

2014

Carter
Meet Carter ›

2013

Presleigh
Meet Presleigh ›

2013

Race
Meet Race ›

2012

Payton
Meet Payton ›

2011

Giovanni
Meet Giovanni ›

2010

Grayson
Meet Grayson ›

2010

Landon
Meet Landon ›

2009

Corvin
Meet Corvin ›

2008

Alondra
Meet Alondra ›

2008

Corbin
Meet Corbin ›

2008

Gertie and 
Sam
Meet Gertie & Sam ›

2007

Matthew
Meet Matthew ›

2007

Nick
Meet Nick ›

2006

Maddi
Meet Nick ›

2006

Nolan
Meet Nick ›
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